Maybe for sock knitters who like to crochet?

Below I’m going to leave you with a crochet pattern for a small bucket bag that can be carried around. I made it so I could carry a sock project to my knitting group. The bucket shape allows the yarn to stay inside the bag while I knit away, letting the skein unravel without rolling all over the place.

The closure of the bag is also the shoulder strap, woven into a round of ch1 spaces. You pull on the elastic and the bag cinches closed.

Without any more delay, here’s the pattern and a couple of pics:

Wavy Crocheted Bucket Bag

Photo Jul 11, 3 07 22 PMPhoto Jul 11, 3 08 28 PM

Materials:

For the crocheted bag:

3 skeins DMC Natura Just Cotton; each in a different color: Color A, Color B, and Color C (Colors pictured: Color A N 37 “Canelle”; Color B: N 10 “Blue Jeans”; Color C: N 80 “Salome”)

Crochet hook size size D US / 3.00 mm or size to obtain gauge (if you care)

Gauge (not critical): 24 single crochet x 24 rounds single crochet = 4″

For the closure / shoulder strap:

1 long strand of elastic webbing or shoe lace, about 1/2″ wide

1 button with a buckle center (a bar going across it instead of 4 or 2 holes) or just a small buckle, about 1″ x 1″

For the lining:

1 piece of medium-weight fabric that’s 25″ wide and 10″ tall

1 piece of medium-weight fabric with enough area to cut out an 8″ circle

Nylon sewing thread to match the color of the fabric for sewing the lining to the bag. (Note: I recommend nylon for this stage because for the top of a liner it is awesomely flexible and sturdy when you want some ease between the bag and the liner.)

Sewing thread to sew the lining together.

You can match your two pieces of fabric or have them be different colors or prints. I don’t think it matters much.

Remember that if you decide not to follow gauge, you’ll need more or less fabric depending on the resulting dimensions of your bag.

Dimensions:

Diameter = 6″ Height = 7 1/2″

Step 1: Crochet the bag in the round, from the bottom up:

Round 1: with color A, make a magic ring; 7 sc into magic ring; join with slip stitch to first sc

Round 2: chain 3 (counts as 1st dc); dc in first sc; 2 dc in each sc around; join with slip stitch to top of  beginning dc. (14 dc)

Round 3: ch 3; dc in next dc and each dc around; join with slip stitch to beginning dc. (14 dc)

Round 4: rep round 2. (28 dc)

Round 5: rep round 3. (28 dc)

Round 6: rep round 2. (56 dc)

Round 7: rep round 3. (56 dc)

Round 8: rep round 2. (112 dc)

Round 9: ch 1, sc in first dc and each dc around; join with slip stitch to first sc. (112 sc)

Round 10: ch 1, sc in first sc and each sc around; join with slip stitch to first sc. (112 sc)

Rounds 11-14: rep round 10, ending round 14 changing to color B. (112 sc)

Round 15: with color B, ch 1, *sc in next sc, hdc in next 2 sc, dc in next 2 sc, tr in next 3 sc, dc in next 2 sc, hdc in next 2 sc, sc in next 2 sc; rep from * around; join with slip stitch into beginning ch 1, changing to color A (112 stitches)

Round 16: with color A, ch 1, sc in each stitch around; join with slip stitch to beginning ch 1 changing to color C. (112 stitches)

Round 17. with color C, ch 4 (counts as tr), *tr in next sc, dc in next 2 sc, hdc in next 2 sc, sc in next 3 sc, hdc in next 2 sc, dc in next 2 sc, tr in next 2 sc;* rep from * around, ending with slip stitch into the top of beginning tr, changing to color A. (112 stitches)

Round 18. with color A, ch 1, sc in each stitch around, ending with slip stitch into beginning ch 1 changing to color B. (112 stitches)

Rounds 19-42: rep rounds 15-18 six times without changing to B at the end of round 42. (112 stitches)

Rounds 43-45: with color A, ch 1, sc in each stitch around, ending with slip stitch into beginning sc. (112 stitches)

Round 46: with color A, ch 1, sc in each stitch around, ending with slip stitch into beginning sc and changing to color C. (112 stitches)

Round 47: with color C, ch 3 (counts as beginning dc); dc in each stitch around; join with slip stitch to top of beginning dc, switching to color B. (112 stitches)

Round 48. with color B, ch 4 (counts as beginning dc + ch 1); *skip next dc, dc in dc, ch 1*; rep from * around, join with slip stitch to top of beginning dc).

Round 49. with color B, ch 2 (counts as beginning herringbone dc); herringbone dc in each stitch around; join with slip stitch to top of beginning herringbone dc.

Weave in ends, block to desired dimensions. Dimensions: Diameter 6″ Height: 7 1/2″

Step 2: Sew a lining into the bag

Note well: I made my lining so it would have about 1/2″ of ease because I just think it helps the bucket stand up better. It’s really kind of important to line the bag otherwise the stuff inside will stick out or, worse, fall out!

Photo Jul 11, 3 07 54 PM

Cut out a circular piece of fabric that is 8″ in diameter (or 2″ more in diameter than the crocheted bag’s diameter)

Cut out a rectangular piece of fabric that is 10″ tall and 25″ long (or approximately 2 1/2″ taller than the crocheted bag and long enough to meet the bag liner’s bottom’s circumference)

With right sides facing each other, sew the ends of the rectangular piece of fabric together, leaving 1/2″ seam allowance. This turns the rectangle into a cylinder that is 10″ tall.

With right sides facing each other, pin the circular piece of fabric to the bottom of the cylinder. Sew in place.

Insert the lining into the bag, with wrong sides of the lining facing the wrong sides of the crocheted bag. Fold the top of the cylindrical fabric down so that the folded edge meets up with wrong side of round 47 of the crocheted bag (the round of dc in color C). The fabric cylinder will now have a cuff on the top.

Remove the fabric from the crocheted bag, maintaining the fold, and press along the folded edge with a hot iron. Insert the liner back inside the bag, pin it in place, and sew the top edge of the liner to the color C dc using running stitch. In case you wonder what “running stitch” is, it looks like this:

Photo Jul 11, 3 08 04 PM

Weave the elastic webbing through the ch1 spaces created in round 48 (the dc-ch1 round in color B). Leave one ch1 space empty. Adjust the elastic webbing so that the lengths that are not woven into the ch1 spaces are of equal length. Weave the ends of the elastic through the buckle. The idea is to stuff those ends in there so that they cannot move, like in this picture:

Photo Jul 11, 3 07 41 PM copy

That’s it! Enjoy your bag.

Helpful hint: you can copy and paste the text of the pattern into a word processor if you want to print it without the pictures.

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2 thoughts on “Maybe for sock knitters who like to crochet?

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